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She’s never met a story she didn’t like.


I know, I know.  You’ve heard it all before:  she’s a Renaissance journalist, she can write about anything, she’s a Jill of all trades.  Plenty of writers say it.  But do they really mean it?

No, Laura Laing is not going to be able to write about any topic under the sun.  But she’ll tackle just about anything with vim and vigor.  She’s written serious stories about Baltimore's Mental Health Court, informational articles about cloth v. disposable diapers and creative looks at child discipline methods.  Her work for trade publications include stories about family friendly workplace policies and finding the right patient management software. And she's had the pleasure of profiling Ingrid Newkirk, founder and president of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, David Koz, smooth jazz saxophonist, and Jean Small, Baltimore octogenarian and do-gooder. 

Laura’s not just a journalist.  Corporate and government clients come to her because she’s easy to work with and produces top-notch copy, designed to get readers out of their seats.  She’s written copy for government brochures and amusement park marketing efforts.  Non-profits come to Laura for feel-good profiles of their clients and volunteers.

And her educational background makes Laura the perfect fit for curriculum writing.  Take a look at her contribution to supplementary materials for Detroit’s summer reading program. Her experience as a math teacher brings real-life experience to the table, as this prime number maze shows. And when ECS Learning needed writers for third-, fourth- and fifth-grade math workbooks, Laura stepped in. Her clients agree: Laura knows how to get students—and teachers—excited about learning.

In June 2009, Laura became a blogger with the National and Lesbian Journalist Association's RE:ACT initiative. Along with several other journalists, she is offering analysis of GLBT coverage in the mainstream media, furthering the conversation about how GLBT issues and individuals are addressed in print, as well as on the radio and television.

Laura can provide all of the same stuff that other writers offer:  timely stories with juicy hooks, snappy wordsmithing, and a surgeon’s precision with details and deadlines.  What she can also do is turn the evergreen to edgy, the tedious to titillating, the controversial to congenial.

 




 
Laura Laing