Union Craft Takes Beer Brewing Seriously

Jmore: Baltimore Jewish Living, see story The sharp scent of hops is strong in Union Craft Brewing’s tasting room. That’s because four Ziploc gallon bags of the fresh, green, flowering cones are lined up and open along a shelf on a wall. Over speakers, a cover of “A Whiter Shade of Pale” transitions to head-banging metal. Master brewer and co-owner/founder Kevin Blodger sits at the end of the bar, looking at a laptop screen. Behind the bar, 12 taps are lined up like little soldiers, their contents displayed on chalkboards above.The sharp scent of hops is strong in Union Craft Brewing’s tasting room. That’s because four Ziploc gallon bags of the fresh, green, flowering cones are lined up and open along a shelf on a wall. This place is chill. About six guys are canning beer in the brew house next door. Colorful empty cans trapped in twisting conveyors wind down to be filled with seasonal red ale, their lids popped on before...
Read More

HIV Positive: A Q&A with Dr. Robert Gallo

Baltimore City Paper, see story Photographs of microscopic organisms line the walls of the Institute of Human Virology entryway. Resembling modern abstract paintings, these framed images of colorful cells are at the root of the deadliest pandemic of our time--HIV. For the layperson, these beautiful photos belie the horrendous impact of AIDS. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that in the 25 years of the AIDS pandemic, more than 500,000 Americans have died of the disease, and 25 million people have died worldwide. According to Dr. David Holtgrave of Johns Hopkins University’s Bloomberg School of Public Health, in the United States a person dies from AIDS every 33 minutes, and there is a new HIV infection every 13 minutes. Amazingly, about 25 percent of the 1.1 million people in this country living with HIV don’t even know they are infected. But in many ways, things are less grim than they were 25 years ago when AIDS was discovered, at least in the...
Read More

Heart of a Pioneer, Soul of a Scientist

Exceptional Americas, Ernst & Young Meet Terri Kelly, CEO of Gore–America's most innovative company Terri Kelly is the first to admit it. “I can talk forever,” laughs the CEO and president of W. L. Gore & Associates. And as the leader of one of the most innovative companies in the world, she’s got plenty to talk about. “I am such a context setter,” she says. “It’s all about giving people the big picture. I don’t like it when you leave a conversation and the communication wasn’t clear.” There are two important things to know about Gore: the company develops cutting-edge products, and it accomplishes this using a truly unique management structure. As head communicator, Kelly is ushering the unique Gore culture into the virtual age and with a global presence. In 1958, William Gore founded W. L. Gore & Associates, growing the company quickly with sales offices in Los Angeles and London, a manufacturing plant in Germany and a licensing agreement in Japan, all before 1970....
Read More

Now That’s Magic!

Exceptional Americas magazine, Ernst & Young How this legendary basketball athlete has become a business superstar, too. It was Earvin “Magic” Johnson’s rookie year with the Lakers and, at a mere 20 years old, his first NBA championship. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was injured with a sprained ankle that was so swollen his doctors wouldn’t let him fly to Philadelphia with the team. Right before the sixth game, it was a big blow. Surrounded by defeated teammates, only Johnson was inexplicably hopeful. “I knew I had an hour to work on the guys at that airport and then I was going to have five hours [on the plane] to work on their mindset and attitude to get ready for this big game,” he recalls. “So I thought about what I should do.” Abdul-Jabbar always took the first seat on the plane so that, during boarding, every other player had to walk past him. Johnson thought: “I’m going to go and be the first one on that plane...
Read More

Ingrid Newkirk, PETA

Inside Business, Norfolk Founder and executive director, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals Ingrid Newkirk wasn't born a vegan. She once wore leather and used products that were tested on animals. Like most people, the co-founder and president of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals came into her cruelty-free lifestyle gradually. Born in Britain, Newkirk grew up in France and India. Her mother worked with Mother Teresa, and as a result, Newkirk got a good dose of charity from a young age. “She always said it doesn't matter who suffers but how,” Newkirk said of her mother. Newkirk grew up rescuing animals, particularly stray dogs, and by the time she moved to America in the early 1970s, she had shifted career focus — from a stockbroker to a kennel worker. PETA began in her Maryland apartment, and over the years her meager efforts expanded. Today PETA has more than 80,000 members, 120 staff members and offices in four countries. In the mid­1990s, Newkirk moved...
Read More